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No longer cross-posting [Apr. 23rd, 2010|04:55 pm]
[music |Fire and Rain -- James Taylor]

I originally got a LiveJournal simply as a convenience for commenting on my friend's LiveJournal posts. Then, during the period that I wasn't keeping an on-line journal of my own, I posted an occasional entry. Since updating my website to a modern content management system a couple years ago, though, I have had a blog where I could post the sort of thing that I had been posting here.

For a little while I was cross-posting from that journal to this one, but it turned out that I didn't like the result. So, I've stopped cross-posting. I wanted to mention that I have been continuing to post at my own site. 

If you're interested in keeping up with me and my writing, I'd be pleased if you stopped by philipbrewer.net or pointed your feed reader that way.
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Guest post at Self Reliance Exchange [Jan. 12th, 2010|03:16 pm]

I was invited to write a guest post for Self Reliance Exchange and was pleased to give them Find Your Self-Sufficient Sweet Spot.

There’s a reason we don’t see more self-sufficiency: It’s not frugal. It almost always takes more time to make something than it takes to earn enough money to buy one—and that’s without even considering the time it takes to learn the skills (let alone the cost of tools and materials). On the other hand, frugality is a powerful enabler for self-sufficiency. So, how do you find the sweet spot?

My wife spins and weaves. I have a beautiful sweater that she hand knit from hand spun yarn. It’s wonderful—and it’s comforting to know that my household is not only self-sufficient in woolens, we produce a surplus that we can sell or trade. But the fact is you can buy a perfectly good sweater at Wal-Mart for less than the cost of the yarn to knit it.

There’s a lot of useful tips and trick for living a more self-sufficient life at the Self Reliance Exchange. Totally aside from my article there, it’s worth checking them out.

Originally published at Philip Brewer. You can comment here or there.

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Ginger sparkle cookies [Jan. 9th, 2010|07:00 pm]
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Ginger sparkle cookies, originally uploaded by bradipo.

I was thinking brownies, but Jackie bakes the brownies and she was already spending as much time in the kitchen today as she really wanted. So I baked a post-holiday batch of ginger sparkles.

Creative Commons License
Ginger sparkle cookies by Philip Brewer is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License.

Originally published at Philip Brewer. You can comment here or there.

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Multiple choice question for drivers [Jan. 7th, 2010|12:47 pm]

The road is snow-covered such that it is impossible to see the lines of the crosswalk.  Does this make it more or less important to yield to pedestrians in the crosswalk?

  1. More important
  2. Less important
  3. Equally as important as when the road is clear
  4. Shut up!  Can’t you see I’m on the phone!

Originally published at Philip Brewer. You can comment here or there.

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Burial instructions [Jan. 2nd, 2010|12:42 pm]

At brunch yesterday the topic of burial instructions came up, and I was surprised to discover that Jackie didn’t remember that I’d already documented my wishes for dealing with my remains.  The gist of my instructions is that (although I’d urge her to be guided by frugality) she should do whatever she wants.  However, I did add this proviso:

4. If there’s no good reason to prefer one thing over another for reasons of convenience or cost, I’d really like to have my body eaten by vultures.

Sadly, I’ve seen no move toward making sky burial socially acceptable in the United States.

Originally published at Philip Brewer. You can comment here or there.

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Made a “best of” list! [Jan. 1st, 2010|08:25 am]

My story “An Education of Scars” made the Best New Stories of 2009 at Free SF Reader, which gave it a rating of 4 out of 5.  Since they didn’t give any “5 out of 5″ ratings last year, that puts my story pretty close to the top of the list.

Originally published at Philip Brewer. You can comment here or there.

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Writing in 2009 [Dec. 31st, 2009|07:01 pm]

I published one short story in 2009:

My story submission database isn’t really set up to answer the question of how many new stories I wrote this year, but I see three whose first submission to an editor was in 2009.  Hopefully some of those will appear in 2010.

Two articles of mine appeared as guest posts at personal financial blogs:

I wrote 71 posts for Wise Bread.  I’ve bolded a few where I thought I managed to say just what I was trying to say, and commend them to your attention:

One of my Wise Bread posts (Understand Capital Costs) was featured in in US Airways Magazine (October 2009, page 22).

Originally published at Philip Brewer. You can comment here or there.

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Our Christmas Star [Dec. 23rd, 2009|07:43 am]


Our Christmas Star, originally uploaded by bradipo.

When I first moved out on my own I had only sparse Christmas decorations. Among the things that were lacking was a star for the top of the tree.

I didn’t feel it was so terrible–the tree was decorated, even if it didn’t have something on top. One Christmas, though, my brother and his wife came to visit at Christmas, and Alisa was appalled. Rather than tolerate such a defect, she cut a star out of shirt cardboard, covered it in aluminum foil, and put it on top of the tree.

I was delighted. I kept that star and used it on my trees for many years.

We went on using it for some time after I got married, until Jackie started doing needle-felting. Then she decided that a Christmas star would be a perfect little project. She needle-felted this star, which has been our tree-topper ever since.

Creative Commons License
Our Christmas Star by Philip Brewer is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

Originally published at Philip Brewer. You can comment here or there.

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Cthulhu in Hermes Scarf [Dec. 19th, 2009|03:14 pm]
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Cthulhu in Hermes Scarf, originally uploaded by bradipo.

Is it just me, or do the images of horse ribbons on this Hermes scarf look like images of Cthulhu?

I’m prepared to accept that it’s just me.

Creative Commons License
Cthulhu in Hermes Scarf by Philip Brewer is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

Originally published at Philip Brewer. You can comment here or there.

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Clarion journals findable again [Dec. 18th, 2009|05:08 pm]

Since the demise of Hilary Moon Murphy’s Clarion Ex Machina site, there hasn’t been a good collection of links to all the various Clarion journals.  Now Liz Argall has fixed that with her page of Clarion blogs, journals, articles and interviews.

There’s lots of good stuff there.  I don’t know of a better source of raw material for people who are interested in the Clarion experience.

Originally published at Philip Brewer. You can comment here or there.

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